A simple gathered skirt for a fabulous frolic in the fields… we all need one of those!

There’s a painting I once saw at MOMA in New York by Andrew Wyeth– of a woman with her back turned to the viewer in a  treeless field. It was an enticing painting, it evoked a mood and provoked thought about who she was and what she was doing there…. in my own mind, there could be no question that where she sat looked like a great place to be, (though perhaps not where her mind was at).. open space versus the confines of a house. Despite the dark colours I always thought of it as a relatively pleasant painting… dreamy… poignant… What does one wear in such a casual but dreamy moment?

A skirt in seersucker to match the seersucker blouse. The white broderie anglaise bow was purchased... but what a cute compliment to the whole outfit... wonder if I will have a tom boy after all (!)

A skirt in seersucker to match the seersucker blouse. The white broderie anglaise bow was purchased… but what a cute compliment to the whole outfit… wonder if I will have a tom boy after all (!) Elastic will be inserted and sewn in once I can measure her up…!

So here is a skirt in seersucker to match the seersucker blouse of my last post ( a bit dark… sorry… the joy of night time interior photography). Fabulous for field frolics I am sure. I have used the same pattern book (A Sunny Spot), but honestly, I wasn’t very rigid in my method as I couldn’t translate as many of the instructions! Essentially, it looked very simple anyway, a rectangle of fabric gathered into a waistband- the waistband is fed with 1.5cm elastic. Yep, simple. Uber simple. Any simpler and you’d be wearing a sarong. But as I said in my last post, a Sunny Spot is beautifully photographed… I couldn’t resist making it up and it was another fast option for the busy people out there looking for quick sewing options.

The gathered skirt from A Sunny Spot

The gathered skirt from A Sunny Spot

The primary modifications were I didn’t line the skirt (I don’t think that will be a problem since it is so gathered) and made the hem allowance huge and also did a massive seam up the back… why? When little girl grows out of it, I don’t see the point of making a brand new skirt, I’ll just create a new seam and let the hem down and thread through a larger piece of elastic… I love the seersucker so much (why does it make me think of Provinicial France)??? that I am sure it will be a favourite. And I am not so much lazy as time poor at the best of times! What I did think other “sew-istas”out there would find interesting was that this was my first attempt to do a blind hem with my elna SU. I think it actually turned out pretty well, though I was worried about the machine tension… the iron was a good friend at this point in the project. It certainly beat doing it by hand, as would have been my normal modus operandum. For anyone who is interested in trying blind hemming, or specifically blind hemming with the elna, here are a couple of images that might help you figure it out, including one from my elna SU manual. I machine stitched after pressing a double fold at the bottom. If anyone has any ideas on how to completely eliminate the show through of the hem after pressing, (without the hurdle of an underlining), do let me know… Maybe a slim strip of organza???

The front and back hem of the skirt. The lower hem shows what the under stitches look like from the inside, the hem at the top shows how it appears on the outside... pretty neat I thought, for a first effort..!

The front and back hem of the skirt. The lower hem shows what the under stitches look like from the inside, the hem at the top shows how it appears on the outside… pretty neat I thought, for a first effort..!

As seen in my elna SU manual... this image was particularly helpful... The elna SU has inbuilt blind hem stitch (so a separate cam isn't necessary).

As seen in my elna SU manual… this image was particularly helpful… The elna SU has inbuilt blind hem stitch (so a separate cam/ disc isn’t necessary).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s